The past and enthusiasm for motorcycles perfectly mix together inside The National Motorcycle Museum, a mystical place that stores years of motorcycle history inside its walls: motorcycles that made history and masterpieces belonged to brave hearts who lived incredible adventures on two wheels.

This is the right place for who deeply desires to witness the focal steps of motorcycles history, from the beginning of time, up until today: a sensorial journey back in time that will make you feel like a 20th century biker. Let’s discover more about this epic place.

The National Motorcycle Museum, located in Anamosa, Iowa, was founded in 1989 by people who loved motorcycle with the main goal of preserving historical models and to pass on their myth also thanks to accessories and documents. It stores hundreds of motorcycle models from all over the world: from Great Britain to Japan, passing through Europe.

More than 100 years of history passed on also thanks to:

  • Motorcycle gear
  • Photographs
  • Advertising graphics

All this is possible thanks to all the fundings coming from sponsorships, fund raisers, and donations by bikers that want to actively be part of The National Motorcycle Museum evolution.

Learn more about the customized models

As we were saying before, inside The National Motorcycle Museum is possible to find a large number of customized and historical motorcycle models.

Among the most curious, we can find:

Margaret Wilson’s 1950 Harley-Davidson Scooter. Mike Wilson – her husband – was an experienced aircraft mechanic, fabricator, racer and race tuner. He decided to take a Harley Davidson S-125 “Hammer”, section it everywhere to make it shorter and make it closer to the ground. Because of his experience, the finished product looked like it came out right out the factory. The color scheme is Motor Maids, a women’s organization formed in the 1940 with which Mike and Margaret were involved.

A single carburator Thunderbolt BSA 650 produced between 1964 and 1972.Some say that the 1970 model is the best model run. It had dual horns, strengthened, and enlarged cylinder base studs. Plus, the clutch actuator design was borrowed from Triumph and represented a huge improvement. Driven by American Transportation laws, clutch and breaks levers were designed to house holes for mirror mountings.

1982 XV 920 Yamaha Virago Cafe Racer. Ron Benvard, race tuner and mechanic, inspired by Doc’s Chops Virago, decided to get to work on an immaculate Virago he saw in the neighborhood. He bought it, and completely revolutionized it. The frame, welded by his son, is made of two-inch steel tubing. Suspensions are from a Yamaha R6, the speedo is from Dime City Cycles and the tank is from a Benelli Mohave. Everything else comes off ebay listings. The paint job is absolutely iconic: it has references to the Ace café in London and the Ton Up status that comes when exceeding 100mph riding on British roadways from a tavern to another. A build that definitely shows Ron Benvard enthusiasm for the British TT.

These are only some of the motorcycles you will be able to find inside The National Motorcycle Museum. More models form Harley-Davidson, Indian, BMW, Triumphs and other iconic brands fill the rooms of this incredible place in Anamosa, Iowa.

Have you already visited this place? If the answer is a “Yes”, share your experience with us.
If your answer is a “Nope” there’s only one thing I can tell you: What are you waiting for?